Family/Matrimonial Law

Bringing closure to family issues.

Family law is a practice area concerned with the legal issues involving family relationships—such as adoptions, divorce, prenuptial agreements, and child custody. Our legal services include all of the noted issues as well as requests for protective orders.


Child Custody
If you have minor children and the relationship has ended between the parents, it is important to come to an understanding about custody and support for the children. Custody has two components: (1) physical custody and (2) legal custody.

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Divorce
If you suddenly find yourself in a situation where your marriage is ending, you probably feel overwhelmed with emotion and frightened by the prospect of facing the legal process. What will happen with the children?

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Mediation
Most family law matters are referred to mediation. Mediation provides an opportunity to settle the case amicably, rather than leave it to a judge who will have a limited amount of time to consider your case. No one will ever know your situation better than you and your spouse, particularly regarding the needs of your children. A judge simply may not have enough time to craft a child access schedule that reflects the needs of the children, along with the schedules of the parents.

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Prenuptial Agreements
If you are planning to marry and have significant assets, a prenuptial agreement can protect your assets if you divorce in the future. A prenuptial agreement can also limit, or even eliminate, the possibility that you would have to pay alimony to your spouse.

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Protective Orders
If you or your minor child are a victim of abuse, you can file for a protective order 24 hours a day at a commissioner’s office in your local District Court building (or at a Circuit Court during regular business hours).

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Appeals
After your trial concludes, if you are not satisfied with the result, there may be a legal basis for an appeal. On the other hand, you may be perfectly content with the trial judge’s decision, but you may find yourself in the appellate courts after the other side notes an appeal.

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